Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church
7031 Waxhaw Highway
Lancaster, SC 29720
Phone: 803-283-4969
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Our Lady of Grace adheres to Child Safety standards as set forth by the Diocese of Charleston.   Please understand that if you are not directly involved with our Faith Formation program, you are not permitted to enter the building until class is over and all children have been dismissed.   

If you any questions, please feel free to contact, Mary Costantino via email OLOGFF@hotmail.com, Safety Director for Our Lady of Grace.  Thank you for your understanding and cooperation. 

 ENROLLMENT Open for 2015-2016 Year


Visit us at:  http://www.stanneschool.com/wp/

Is St. Anne High School right for you?
Questions? info@stanneschool.com ​

To schedule, personalized tours – Contact Michelle Hatchett 803-324-4814803-324-4814
ATTENTION:  Saturday Mass Attendees

The Lancaster Sheriff's department has asked those exiting onto 521 NOT to use the throughway as a turnaround.   Please go to the light  at Collins Road and make a U-turn as this will be a safer route and will not block traffic traveling north on 521.  
Thank you for your consideration.
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Directions to  the Rec Center or Parish House 
may be found on the bottom of the Home Page.

4pm Mass at the Rec Center

7:30 Mass
9:00 Faith Formation (K-5)
10:30 Teen Talk
​10:30 Stations of the Cross Practice

10:30  Choir Practice

9:30 Mass with Ashes
11am Mass with Ashes
Noon Women's Group
5pm Liturgy of the Word with Ashes

10:30 Rosary
11am Mass
1:00 Adult Education - Symbolon

​4pm Mass at the Rec Center

7:30 Mass
9am Faith Formation (K-5)
10:30 Teen Talk


     Excerpt "Saint Francis is the example par excellence of care for the vulnerable and of an integral ecology lived out joyfully and authentically. He is the patron saint of all who study and work in the area of ecology, and he is also much loved by non-Christians. He was particularly concerned for God’s creation for the poor and outcast. He loved, and was deeply loved for his joy, his generous
self-giving, his openheartedness. He was a mystic and a pilgrim who lived in simplicity and in wonderful harmony with God, with others, with nature and with himself. He shows us just how inseparable the bond is between concern for nature, justice for the poor, commitment to society,
and interior peace".
Pope Francis' Encyclical Letter on Care for Our Common Home, Laudato Si
Click on the photo to read the Encyclical
Fifth Sunday in Ordinary Time, Cycle C

First Reading                               Isaiah 6:1-2a,3-8
Isaiah describes his vision and call from the Lord.

Responsorial Psalm                    Psalm 138:1-5,7-8
A song of thanks to God who saves us

Second Reading
1 Corinthians 15:1-11 (shorter form, 1 Corinthians 15:3-8,11)

Paul reminds the Corinthians of the gospel that he announced to them.

Gospel Reading                             Luke 5:1-11
The fishermen (Simon, James, and John) leave their fishing boats and follow Jesus.

  Last Sunday, we heard how Jesus was rejected in his hometown of Nazareth. In the verses that follow, Jesus travels to the town of Capernaum and begins his ministry of teaching and healing. While in Capernaum, Jesus cures a man possessed with a demon and heals Simon's mother-in-law. After spending some time there, Jesus prepares to preach in other places. The fact that Jesus had previously been in Simon's home and healed his mother-in-law suggests that this encounter is not the first between Jesus and Simon Peter. We can read today's Gospel, therefore, as a description of the developing relationship between Jesus and Simon Peter.

  In today's Gospel, Jesus teaches from Simon's boat. Jesus turns to Simon and instructs him about where to lower the fishing nets. Simon and others have been fishing throughout the night and have not caught anything. Simon protests, claiming that such an effort would be futile. Simon ultimately obeys Jesus and lowers his nets into the deeper water as directed. Notice here that Peter calls Jesus by the title “master.” He already recognizes Jesus as a person of authority. They catch so many fish that the nets begin to tear; Jesus' presence has created abundance out of scarcity, just as it did at the wedding feast at Cana, which we heard at Mass just a few weeks ago.

 Simon Peter becomes a follower of Jesus immediately. He calls Jesus “Lord”—the title given to Jesus after his Resurrection—and protests his worthiness to be in Jesus' presence. Today's Gospel, therefore, marks a turning point in the relationship between Jesus and Peter.

  Two of Simon's partners are also named as witnesses to the event described in today's Gospel: Zebedee's sons, James and John. Yet Jesus' words are addressed only to Simon. Jesus gives Simon a new job, telling him that he will become a different kind of fisherman. No longer will he catch fish; instead he will catch people. In these words, we hear the beginning of the leadership role that Peter will have within the community of disciples. Peter was chosen for this role. His task will be to bring others to Jesus. Already he is doing so; the Gospel tells us that all the fishermen with Peter also left their nets and followed Jesus.

  We continue to speak of Peter's leadership and influence in the Church today when we call the pope the “successor of Peter.” We participate in the mission of the Church when we bring people to Christ through the example and positive influence of our lives.
     On Care for Our Common Home (Laudato Si') is the new appeal from Pope Francis addressed to "every person living on this planet" for an inclusive dialogue about how we are shaping the future of our planet. Pope Francis calls the Church and the world to acknowledge the urgency of our environmental challenges and to join him in embarking on a new path. This encyclical is written with both hope and resolve, looking to our common future with candor and humility. 
Daily Mass and Sunday Mass are available online.  

                                    ​to go to the website.

  Dear brothers and sisters, I have often thought of how the Church may render more clear her mission to be a witness to mercy; and we have to make this journey. It is a journey which begins with spiritual conversion. Therefore, I have decided to announce an Extraordinary Jubilee which has at its centre the mercy of God. It will be a Holy Year of Mercy. We want to live in the light of the word of the Lord: “Be merciful, even as your Father is merciful” (cf. Lk 6:36). And this especially applies to confessors! So much mercy!












of this Jubilee to the Pontifical Council for Promoting the New Evangelization, in order that it may come to life as a new step on the Church’s journey in her mission to bring the Gospel of mercy to each person.

     I am confident that the whole Church, which is in such need of mercy for we are sinners, will be able to find in this Jubilee the joy of rediscovering and rendering fruitful God’s mercy, with which we are all called to give comfort to every man and every woman of our time. Do not forget that God forgives all, and God forgives always. Let us never tire of asking forgiveness. Let us henceforth entrust this Year to the Mother of Mercy, that she turn her gaze upon us and watch over our journey: our penitential journey, our year-long journey with an open heart, to receive the indulgence of God, to receive the mercy of God.
- Excerpt from the Homily of Pope Francis
  Lord Jesus Christ, you have taught us to be merciful like the heavenly Father, and have told us that whoever sees you sees Him.
  Show us your face and we will be saved. Your loving gaze freed Zacchaeus and Matthew from being enslaved by money; the adulteress and Magdalene from seeking happiness only in created things; made Peter weep after his betrayal, and assured Paradise to the repentant thief.
  Let us hear, as if addressed to each one of us, the words that you spoke to the Samaritan woman:  
  “If you knew the gift of God!” You are the visible face of the invisible Father, of the God who manifests his power above all by forgiveness and mercy: let the Church be your visible face in the world, its Lord risen and glorified.
  You willed that your ministers would also be clothed in weakness in order that they may feel compassion for those in ignorance and error: let everyone who approaches them feel sought after, loved, and forgiven by God.
  Send your Spirit and consecrate every one of us with its anointing, so that the Jubilee of Mercy may be a year of grace from the Lord, and your Church, with renewed enthusiasm, may bring good news to the poor, proclaim liberty to captives and the oppressed, and restore sight to the blind.  
  We ask this of you, Lord Jesus, through the intercession of Mary, Mother of Mercy; you who live and reign with the Father and the Holy Spirit for ever and ever.                           Amen.
  This Holy Year will commence on the next Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception and will conclude on Sunday, 20 November 2016, the Solemnity of Our Lord Jesus Christ, King of the Universe and living face of the Father's mercy. I entrust the organization
Prayer of Pope Francis for the Jubilee
  A Letter from the desk of Father John...

   On December 8th, Pope Francis initiated an Extraordinary Holy year of Mercy by opening the Holy Doors at St.Peter's Basilica in Rome. He invites all of us to experience repentance and renewal. Pilgrims throughout  world who come to Rome will receive Plenary Indulgences when they go through
the Holy Door.
  The Holy Father extends this privilege to the Major Basilicas of Rome all Diocesan Cathedrals and to certain churches. Our Bishop, Robert Guglielmone, has designated The Oratory church in Rock Hill as such a site. I invite you to come The Oratory for prayer and renewal. Confessions are heard every Saturday from 10:30am to 11:30am. Take advantage of this opportunity ... it's a lot more convenient than traveling to Rome. 

Sincerely yours in 
Fr. John Giuliani, 
Rector of The Church of Our Lady and St. Philip Neri
Stations of the Cross

     It's that time of year when we begin planning the presentation of the Stations of the Cross.   We will have our first gathering / meeting on Sunday, February 7th at 10:30.       

January 24, 2016  
Third Sunday of Ordinary Time
January 31, 2016  
Fourth Sunday of Ordinary Time

Pope: Live your faith during Lent, perform works of mercy

By Cindy Wooden Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY (CNS) -- Lent is a time of conversion and a time to deepen one's faith, demonstrating and sharing it through the corporal and spiritual works of mercy, Pope Francis said.

  "Faith finds expression in concrete everyday actions meant to help our neighbors in body and spirit," the pope said in his message for Lent, which begins Feb. 10 for Latin-rite Catholics.

  Feeding the hungry, visiting the sick, welcoming strangers, offering instruction, giving comfort -- "on such things will we be judged," the pope wrote in the message, which was released at the Vatican Jan. 26.

  Particularly during the Year of Mercy, he said, Catholics are called to recognize their own need for God's mercy, the greatness of God's love seen in the death and resurrection of Christ and the obligation to assist others by communicating God's love and mercy through words and deeds.

  "The root of all sin" is thinking that one is god, something often expressed in a total preoccupation for accumulating money and power, the pope wrote. And just as individuals can be tempted to think they have no need of God, social and political systems can run the same risk, ignoring both God and the real needs of human beings.

  "Love alone is the answer to that yearning for infinite happiness," Pope Francis wrote. It is the only response to the longings "that we think we can satisfy with the idols of knowledge, power and riches."
​  
  "The danger always remains that by a constant refusal to open the doors of their hearts to Christ who knocks on them in the poor," he said, "the proud, rich and powerful will end up condemning themselves and plunging into the eternal abyss of solitude which is hell."

  But through acts of mercy and charity, "by touching the flesh of the crucified Jesus in the suffering," he wrote, "sinners can receive the gift of realizing that they too are poor and in need."

  "In the corporal works of mercy we touch the flesh of Christ in our brothers and sisters who need to be fed, clothed, sheltered, visited," he wrote. "In the spiritual works of mercy -- counsel, instruction, forgiveness, admonishment and prayer -- we touch more directly our own sinfulness."

  In the Christian life, Pope Francis said, "the corporal and spiritual works of mercy must never be separated."

  Cardinal Francesco Montenegro, president of Caritas Italy and head of the archdiocese that includes the Italian island of Lampedusa, told reporters at a Vatican news conference that the pope's message, like the Bible, "does not stop simply at reaffirming that God is merciful, but clearly indicates that his children must be merciful, too, by living a greater love, especially by taking care of the little ones, the poor and defenseless."

  The cardinal said that from his own experience as archbishop of Agrigento, he has seen how people's faith and joy have grown and become contagious when they not only go to Mass, but also volunteer to assist the thousands of migrants who land on Lampedusa's shore seeking safety and a better life for their families.

  Msgr. Giampietro Dal Toso, secretary of the Pontifical Council Cor Unum, the office that promotes and coordinates Catholic charity, told reporters that Pope Francis wants to help Catholics rediscover the traditional corporal and spiritual works of mercy, which seemed to have been left on the shelf with dusty old books. Maybe, he said, "it was no longer fashionable" to preach about the daily actions of believers or maybe "our ecclesial practice has become quite institutionalized and politicized."

  "The works of mercy are a very simple, concrete, direct, alive, daily, easy, accessible-to-all way of living the Jubilee of Mercy," he said. "The works of mercy describe what we as Christians can actually do every day, and that is why I find them so fascinating."

  As part of Cor Unum's celebration of the Year of Mercy, he said, it has developed materials for a retreat day for people engaged in church charitable activity. The materials are online -- www.corunumjubilaeum.va -- and can be adapted for use by a group, a parish or a diocese.
The Rules for Roman Catholics in the United States

     In the United States, the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops has declared that "the age of fasting is from the completion of the eighteenth year to the beginning of the sixtieth." The USCCB also allows the substitution of some other form of penance for abstinence on all of the Fridays of the year, except for those Fridays in Lent. Thus, the rules for fasting and abstinence in the United States are:

           * Every person 14 years of age or older must abstain from 
             meat (and items made with meat) on Ash Wednesday, Good 
             Friday, and all the Fridays of Lent.

          * Every person between the age of 18 and 59 (your 59th 
            birthday begins your 60th year) must fast on Ash 
            Wednesday and Good Friday.

          * Every person 14 years of age or older must abstain from 
             meat  on all other Fridays of the year, unless he or she 
            substitutes some other form of penance for abstinence.

     Fasting as explained by the US bishops means partaking of only one full meal. Some food (not equaling another full meal) is permitted at breakfast and around mid-day or in the evening - depending on when a person chooses to eat the main or full meal
February 7, 2016  
Fifth Sunday of Ordinary Time
Please note:   Mass on February 20 and 27 will be held at 4pm at 
St. Matthew's South
 4116 Waxhaw-Marvin Road
 Waxhaw, NC 28173