Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church
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7031 Waxhaw Highway     Lancaster, SC 29720   803-283-4969
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Our Lady of Grace adheres to Child Safety standards as set forth by the Diocese of Charleston.   Please understand that if you are not directly involved with our Faith Formation program, you are not permitted to enter the building until class is over and all children have been dismissed.   

If you any questions, please feel free to contact, Mary Costantino via email OLOGFF@hotmail.com, Safety Director for Our Lady of Grace.  Thank you for your understanding and cooperation. 

 ENROLLMENT Open for 2016-2017 Year


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Directions to  the Rec Center or Parish House 
may be found on the bottom of the Home Page.
 Click here to go to Directions.
4pm Mass Farewell Reception for Father Joe

7:30 Mass

10:30  Rosary
11am Mass

10:30 Rosary
11am Mass

​4pm Mass at the Rec Center


7:30 Mass

Thirteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time

First Reading                                       1 Kings 19:16b,19-21
Elijah anoints Elisha as his successor.

Responsorial Psalm                              Psalm 16:1-2,5,7-11
I set the Lord ever before me.

Second Reading                                     Galatians 5:1,13-18
Christ has set us free.

Gospel Reading                                          Luke 9:51-62
Jesus resolutely determined to journey to Jerusalem.

  Today's Gospel reading begins a long section unique to Luke's Gospel. Jesus begins his journey to Jerusalem, which will end with his ministry in Jerusalem. We read that Jesus' days for being “taken up” were fulfilled. The Greek word that Luke uses for “taken up” is the same word he uses to describe the Ascension. We also read that Jesus is determined to journey to Jerusalem. For Luke, Jesus ministry begins in Galilee and then is one long journey to Jerusalem. In Jerusalem he will meet his death but also enter into his glory. Only in Luke does Jesus then spend 40 days in Jerusalem instructing his disciples. It is in Jerusalem that his disciples wait after his Ascension to be sent the Holy Spirit on Pentecost. And it is from Jerusalem, in Luke's second volume, the Acts of the Apostles, that the Good News is spread to Rome and the ends of the earth.

  Immediately Jesus is met with rejection, as a Samaritan village will not receive him because he is going to Jerusalem. There was animosity between Samaritans who worshiped on Mount Gerazim and Jews who worshiped in Jerusalem. Jesus was also rejected as he began his ministry in Galilee in Chapter 4. And he will be rejected for the last time when he reaches Jerusalem. James and John want to call down fire from heaven to destroy the people in the village, but Jesus rebukes them and moves on. There is often the temptation to use violence to achieve right. Jesus has come to break this temptation. He is aware that he must undergo violence himself before he can enter his glory.

  The rest of today's reading is about the radical demands of discipleship. The three people who volunteer to become disciples on this journey show that they do not understand the demands Jesus will make of them. Neither care of self, care for the dead, nor care of one's family (as required by the Fourth Commandment) can come before the demands of discipleship. Jesus reminds the first volunteer, who would go wherever Jesus goes, that animals in the wild have more security than do Jesus and his followers. The second, who wants to bury a parent, is reminded that the demands of proclaiming the Kingdom of God take precedence. And the third, who wants to say farewell to his family, is reminded that once you put your hand to the plow you cannot look back or the furrow will be crooked. Such a person is not ready for the Kingdom of God.

  Jesus seems harsh here, but he is only asking of his disciples what he asks of himself. Jesus' unconditional commitment to God's saving work will demand of him his life. He knows this, but the disciples do not understand. Jesus does not want anyone to rush into discipleship, because the demands of discipleship require everyone considering it to be aware of the cost, make Jesus and his mission central to his life, and then go forward without looking back..
Daily Mass and Sunday Mass are available online.  

                                    ​to go to the website.

  Dear brothers and sisters, I have often thought of how the Church may render more clear her mission to be a witness to mercy; and we have to make this journey. It is a journey which begins with spiritual conversion. Therefore, I have decided to announce an Extraordinary Jubilee which has at its centre the mercy of God. It will be a Holy Year of Mercy. We want to live in the light of the word of the Lord: “Be merciful, even as your Father is merciful” (cf. Lk 6:36). And this especially applies to confessors! So much mercy!












of this Jubilee to the Pontifical Council for Promoting the New Evangelization, in order that it may come to life as a new step on the Church’s journey in her mission to bring the Gospel of mercy to each person.

     I am confident that the whole Church, which is in such need of mercy for we are sinners, will be able to find in this Jubilee the joy of rediscovering and rendering fruitful God’s mercy, with which we are all called to give comfort to every man and every woman of our time. Do not forget that God forgives all, and God forgives always. Let us never tire of asking forgiveness. Let us henceforth entrust this Year to the Mother of Mercy, that she turn her gaze upon us and watch over our journey: our penitential journey, our year-long journey with an open heart, to receive the indulgence of God, to receive the mercy of God.
- Excerpt from the Homily of Pope Francis
  This Holy Year will commence on the next Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception and will conclude on Sunday, 20 November 2016, the Solemnity of Our Lord Jesus Christ, King of the Universe and living face of the Father's mercy. I entrust the organization
  A Letter from the desk of Father John...

   On December 8th, Pope Francis initiated an Extraordinary Holy year of Mercy by opening the Holy Doors at St.Peter's Basilica in Rome. He invites all of us to experience repentance and renewal. Pilgrims throughout  world who come to Rome will receive Plenary Indulgences when they go through
the Holy Door.
  The Holy Father extends this privilege to the Major Basilicas of Rome all Diocesan Cathedrals and to certain churches. Our Bishop, Robert Guglielmone, has designated The Oratory church in Rock Hill as such a site. I invite you to come The Oratory for prayer and renewal. Confessions are heard every Saturday from 10:30am to 11:30am. Take advantage of this opportunity ... it's a lot more convenient than traveling to Rome. 
Sincerely yours in 
Fr. John Giuliani, 
Rector of The Church of Our Lady of Grace and St. Philip Neri
Attention Saturday Evening Mass Attendees at the Recreation Center:

The Lancaster County Emergency Services has requested that there be NO parking in front of the EMS doors nor other parking that may prevent access for emergency vehicles.  Violators may be towed and/or fined.

All drivers are asked NOT to use the turnaround on Hwy 521 but to use the U-Turn option at the intersection with the light.   

Thank you for you cooperation.

Chapter One
In the Light of the Word (continued)

Excerpt from Amoris Laetitia

    18.  The Gospel goes on to remind us that children are not the property of a family, but have their own lives to lead. Jesus is a model of obedience to his earthly parents, placing himself under their charge (cf. Lk 2:51), but he also shows that children’s life decisions and their Christian vocation may demand a parting for the sake of the Kingdom of God (cf. Mt 10:34-37; Lk 9:59-62). Jesus himself, at twelve years of age, tells Mary and Joseph that he has a greater mission to accomplish apart from his earthly family (cf. Lk 2:48-50). In this way, he shows the need for other, deeper bonds even within the family: “My mother and my brethren are those who hear the word of God and do it” (Lk 8:21). All the same, in the concern he shows for children – whom the societies of the ancient Near East viewed as subjects without particular rights and even as family property – Jesus goes so far as to present them as teachers, on account of their simple trust and spontaneity towards others. “Truly I say to you, unless you turn and become like children, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven. Whoever humbles himself like this child, he is the greatest in the kingdom of heaven” (Mt 18:3-4).
A path of suffering and blood
19.  The idyllic picture presented in Psalm 128 is not at odds with a bitter truth found throughout sacred Scripture, that is, the presence of pain, evil and violence that break up families and their communion of life and love. For good reason Christ’s teaching on marriage (cf. Mt 19:3-9) is inserted within a dispute about divorce. The word of God constantly testifies to that sombre dimension already present at the beginning, when, through sin, the relationship of love and purity between man and woman turns into domination: “Your desire shall be for your husband, and he shall rule over you" (Gen 3:16).


To read the letter in its entirety, click here. 
  The USCCB provides Faith Fundamentals!   Visit the new online version of the Catechism of the Catholic Church.   

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What is the Fortnight for Freedom?

  Each year dioceses around the country arrange special events to highlight the importance of defending religious freedom. 
  The Fortnight for Freedom is from June 21—the vigil of the Feasts of St. John Fisher and St. Thomas More—to July 4, Independence Day.
  We are Catholics. We are Americans. We are proud to be both, grateful for the gift of faith which is ours as Christian disciples, and grateful for the gift of liberty which is ours as American citizens. To be Catholic and American should mean not having to choose one over the other. Our allegiances are distinct, but they need not be contradictory, and should instead be complementary. That is the teaching of our Catholic faith, which obliges us to work together with fellow citizens for the common good of all who live in this land. That is the vision of our founding and our Constitution, which guarantees citizens of all religious faiths the right to contribute to our common life together.

  Freedom is not only for Americans, but we think of it as something of our special inheritance, fought for at a great price, and a heritage to be guarded now. We are stewards of this gift, not only for ourselves but for all nations and peoples who yearn to be free. Catholics in America have discharged this duty of guarding freedom admirably for many generations.

  In 1887, when the archbishop of Baltimore, James Gibbons, was made the second American cardinal, he defended the American heritage of religious liberty during his visit to Rome to receive the red hat. Speaking of the great progress the Catholic Church had made in the United States, he attributed it to the "civil liberty we enjoy in our enlightened republic." Indeed, he made a bolder claim, namely that "in the genial atmosphere of liberty [the Church] blossoms like a rose."1
This is not a Catholic issue. This is not a Jewish issue. This is not an Orthodox, Mormon, or Muslim issue. It is an American issue.

  From well before Cardinal Gibbons, Catholics in America have been advocates for religious liberty, and the landmark teaching of the Second Vatican Council on religious liberty was influenced by the American experience. It is among the proudest boasts of the Church on these shores. We have been staunch defenders of religious liberty in the past. We have a solemn duty to discharge that duty today.

  We need, therefore, to speak frankly with each other when our freedoms are threatened. Now is such a time. As Catholic bishops and American citizens, we address an urgent summons to our fellow Catholics and fellow Americans to be on guard, for religious liberty is under attack, both at home and abroad.

  This has been noticed both near and far. Pope Benedict XVI recently spoke about his worry that religious liberty in the United States is being weakened. He called it the "most cherished of American freedoms"—and indeed it is. All the more reason to heed the warning of the Holy Father, a friend of America and an ally in the defense of freedom, in his recent address to American bishops:

   Of particular concern are certain attempts being made to limit that most cherished of American freedoms, the freedom of religion. Many of you have pointed out that concerted efforts have been made to deny the right of conscientious objection on the part of Catholic individuals and institutions with regard to cooperation in intrinsically evil practices. Others have spoken to me of a worrying tendency to reduce religious freedom to mere freedom of worship without guarantees of respect for freedom of conscience.

   Here once more we see the need for an engaged, articulate and well-formed Catholic laity endowed with a strong critical sense vis-à-vis the dominant culture and with the courage to counter a reductive secularism which would delegitimize the Church's participation in public debate about the issues which are determining the future of American society.2
June 12, 2016  
Eleventh Sunday in Ordinary Time

Open to all the Faithful of the Diocese.​
Cost is $20 per person.

Click here for paper registration.
Online registration available, click here

​ If you are interested in carpooling, please email  ologcatholic@gmail.com

Place CARPOOL in the subject line.
August 13, 2016
Columbia Metropolitan Convention Center
9am to 5pm
For more details, please visit the website: http://onfirewithfaith.org/ 
June 19, 2016  
Twelfth Sunday in Ordinary Time
​On vacation and far away from home? 

Find Mass times at Masstimes.org 
June 26, 2016  
Thirteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time