Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church
7031 Waxhaw Highway
Lancaster, SC 29720
Phone: 803-283-4969
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Our Lady of Grace adheres to Child Safety standards as set forth by the Diocese of Charleston.   Please understand that if you are not directly involved with our Faith Formation program, you are not permitted to enter the building until class is over and all children have been dismissed.   

If you any questions, please feel free to contact, Mary Costantino via email OLOGFF@hotmail.com, Safety Director for Our Lady of Grace.  Thank you for your understanding and cooperation. 
AWARDED  2015 Innovations in Catholic Education
 by  Today's Catholic Teacher!
Click here to read the full story.


Elementary Teaching Position Available
The candidate should hold certification in elementary education (grades 1-6) and be committed to teaching in a faith-based school.  Please send resume to Shaileen Riginos principal@stanneschool.com

Visit Middle and High School
Join us on Wednesday, April 1, from 10:30 to 12:30 to see what St. Anne Middle and High School are all about.  There will be a Q & A session with current SAS students, school tour and more.  Please RSVP to info@stanneschool.com by March 25th. 

Summer Camp at SAS
St. Anne Summer programs offer a wide variety of camps for ages 3-18 and are open to all.  Cly works, Kids in the Kitchen, Eagles Soccer Camp, Creative Writing, PSAT/SAT Prep and SO much more...www.SASsummerprograms.com.  Contact Kym Deer for more information kdeer@stanneschool.com

Visit us at:  http://www.stanneschool.com/wp/

Is St. Anne High School right for you?
Questions? info@stanneschool.com ​

To schedule, personalized tours – Contact Michelle Hatchett 803-324-4814
ATTENTION:  Saturday Mass Attendees

The Lancaster Sheriff's department has asked those exiting onto 521 NOT to use the throughway as a turnaround.   Please go to the light  at Collins Road and make a U-turn as this will be a safer route and will not block traffic traveling north on 521.  
Thank you for your consideration.
 Gospel at Procession with Palms    Mark 11:1-10 or John 12:12-16
Jesus enters Jerusalem as the crowds shout, “Hosanna!”

First Reading                    Isaiah 50:4-7
The Lord's servant will stand firm, even when persecuted.

Responsorial Psalm         Psalm 22:8-9,17-18,19-20,23-24
A cry for help to the Lord in the face of evildoers

Second Reading               Philippians 2:6-11
Christ was obedient even to death, but God has exalted him.

Gospel Reading                Mark 14:1—15:47 (shorter form: Mark 15:1-39)
Jesus is sentenced to death and crucified. The centurion who witnessed his death declared, “This man was the Son of God.”

     This Sunday, called Palm or Passion Sunday, is the first day of Holy Week. Holy Thursday, Good Friday, and the Easter Vigil on Holy Saturday are called the Triduum—three days that are the highlight of the Church year. There are two Gospels proclaimed at today's Mass. The first Gospel, proclaimed before the procession with palms, tells of Jesus' triumphant entrance into Jerusalem. Riding on a borrowed colt, Jesus was hailed by the crowds as they blessed God and shouted “Hosanna!” This event is reported in each of the four Gospels.

     At the Liturgy of the Word on Palm Sunday, the events of Jesus' passion are proclaimed in their entirety. In Lectionary Cycle B, we read the passion of Jesus as found in the Gospel of Mark. We will hear these events proclaimed again when we celebrate the Triduum later in the week. On Good Friday, we will read the passion of Jesus from the Gospel of John.

     In Mark's Gospel, Jesus' passion and death are presented as the consequence of the tension between the Jewish authorities and Jesus that had been building throughout his public ministry. This tension reached its breaking point when Jesus drove the merchants and moneychangers from the Temple. After this event, the chief priests and scribes began seeking a way to put Jesus to death, and yet, this is only the surface explanation for his death.

     When Jesus was arrested and brought before the Sanhedrin—the council of Jewish priests, scribes, and elders—he was charged with blasphemy, citing his threat to the Temple. When he was brought before Pilate, however, the religious authorities presented his crime as a political one, charging that Jesus claimed to be king of the Jews. In continuity with a theme of Mark's Gospel, the messianic claim of Jesus is widely misunderstood.

     In Mark's Gospel, Jesus' disciples are rarely models of faith and do little to invoke confidence in their capacity to continue his ministry after his death. They fare no better in Mark's narrative of Jesus' passion and death. At the Last Supper, the disciples insisted that none among them would betray Jesus. When Jesus predicted that their faith would be shaken in the events ahead, Peter and the other disciples protested vehemently. Yet in the garden of Gethsemane, Jesus returned three times to find them sleeping. Jesus prayed in agony over his impending fate while his disciples slumbered through the night. Just as Jesus predicted, Peter denied Jesus, and the disciples were absent during Jesus' passion and death. Only the women who had been followers of Jesus in Galilee are said to have been present at the Crucifixion, but they remained at a distance.

     Throughout this Gospel, Mark challenges the reader to consider the claim with which the Gospel begins: Jesus is the Son of God. When we read Mark's account of the passion, we begin to comprehend the deeper theological statement being made about Jesus' death. In Mark's telling of the passion narrative, Jesus understood his death to have been preordained, and he accepted this death in obedience to God's will. Jewish Scripture is quoted only once, but there are several references to the fulfillment of the Scriptures. Jesus understood his anointing in Bethany as an anticipation of his burial, and he announced that this story would be told together with the Gospel throughout the world. Jesus predicted his betrayal by Judas as well as Peter's denial. At his arrest, Jesus acknowledged that the preordained time had arrived. Jesus was both confident and silent before his accusers. After he was sentenced to death, Jesus did not speak again until his final cry from the cross. The bystanders misunderstood and believed that he was calling for Elijah. The Roman centurion, however, affirmed what Mark has presented throughout this Gospel: Jesus is the Son of God. Nowhere was this revealed more fully than in his death on the cross.

     During Holy Week, we prayerfully remember the events of Jesus' passion and death. As we meditate on the cross, we ask again and anew what it means to make the statement of faith that Jesus, in his obedient suffering and dying, revealed himself to us as God's Son. 
Diocesan Happenings
Click on the picture to open the form.
​March    28      4pm Mass at the Rec Center
March    29      7:30am Mass

Holy Week

March    31      10:30 Choir Practice
April        1       10:30  Rosary
                         11am  Mass
April        2      5pm  Mass of the Lord's Supper  
     with Washing of the Feet
April        3      5pm Mass of the Passion of Our Lord
with Communion
April        4        4pm Mass at the Rec Center
April        5        7:30 Mass 

*Directions to  the Rec Center or Parish House may be found on the bottom of the Home Page.


In his Lenten message for 2015, Pope Francis asks us to be firm against indifference (see Jas 5:8) and to seek a heart that is “merciful, attentive and generous.” Embrace his call to mercy by reaching out to those in need. Be attentive to the Lenten call to prayer and be generous with your time and treasure.
Take inspiration for your Lenten journey from this calendar nd raise up the needs of the world in prayer. Sacrifice by giving up food and material wants. Offer your time, talent, and treasure as a good steward of the gifts God has given you.
March 15, 2015  Fourth Sunday of Lent
March 22, 2015  Fifth Sunday of Lent
March 29, 2015  Psalm/Passion Sunday